WORRIED ABOUT GMO FOODS?

Stop.

There are only 10 genetically modified crops available todayThey are alfalfa, apples, canola, corn (field and sweet), cotton, papaya, potatoes, soybeans, squash and sugar beets.

These crops have been genetically modified to express a positive characteristic that makes the crop easier to manage.  An example of these would be improved insect resistance.

Many of these crops are then used as processed ingredients, like sugar or cornstarch.  The sugar or cornstarch might then be included in food products at your local grocery store.  The only way to eat a GMO directly would be if your store includes varieties of papaya, potatoes, squash, sweet corn or apples in their produce aisle.

The list below identifies the genetic traits expressed and uses of the 10 GMO crops approved in the U.S.

GMOs in the U.S.

Although most of these GMO crops are edited for herbicide tolerance and/or insect resistance, this does not mean that the plant cells actually make herbicides or release chemicals.

Many of these crops produce a protein that is indigestible to insects.  When an insect feasts on the plant, it cannot digest the protein and it dies.  Humans CAN digest this protein, so the genetic mutation has zero impact to humans.

IS YOUR HALLOWEEN COSTUME A ‘GOOD’ OR ‘BAD’ FARMER?

Have you heard the kids talking about morphsuits? These stretchy garments are one-piece and cover the wearer completely from head to toe, taking away all distinguishing characteristics, leaving just a human form. They’re all the rage this year for Halloween costumes. With intentions unseen, morphsuit-wearing trick or treaters can ring doorbells and engage in Halloween hijinks with little worry about seeming odd.

Dressing as a farmer for Halloween? Well, you might as well put on a morphsuit. The characteristics that make you and your work what you are really have nothing to do with how you look. Or does it have everything to do with how you look? That’s more likely the case, as farmer attributes are being bestowed on anyone who wears a farmer-suit, which might as well be a morphsuit.

This type of insanity hit me full in the face last week at a conference I attended in Springfield, IL, called “Healthy Farms, Healthy People.” The room was full of more than a hundred public health and environmental health professionals, gathered together to listen to presentations about how better farmers grow better food which makes people who eat the better farmers’ better food, better people, apparently. Those professionals there actually received professional continuing education credits.

Here are a couple highlights from the conference that really ought to scare you:

  • Those guys that grow corn and soybeans all up and down Illinois. They’re not real farmers. They don’t grow food. They don’t even call themselves farmers. Just ask them. They call themselves producers. (From Dave Cleverdon, Organic Farmer, Kinnikinnick Farm; Board Member, Chicago Green City Market)
  • The way that we farm in Illinois drains hundreds of millions of dollars from the Illinois economy. Where could we, if not in Central Illinois, grow real food for local communities? (From Ken Meter, MA, MPA, President, Crossroads Resource Center in Minneapolis)
  • Farmers were better off in 1929 than in 2011, making more money and growing real food for their families and their communities. (Ken Meter)
  • October is now the official “Farm to School” month in Illinois, a signed Proclamation from Governor Quinn.
  • Locally grown, organic, fresh produce, is the only way to cure obesity and diabetes. (From a moderator in the discussion)

Now, on the outside quick glance, the bullet points above might not scare you, but they should. You should have a pretty decent Halloween-style creepy feeling crawling up your neck right now. That ominous feeling is public pressure, coming about from publicly-funded ‘public health’ professionals listening to scare tactics from other ‘professionals’ who are selling speaking gigs, research projects, and books.

Oh, but I’m saving the best part for last. To register for this event, you actually had to describe what kind of farmer you are. Apparently, there are good and bad farmers who either grow real food or they don’t, and that real food is only good food if it’s locally grown, fresh, and organic. It really has nothing to do with say, nutrition, or anything like that. That’s just a detail.

Good farmers (knighted as such by the ‘professionals’) grow real, good food (determined as such as long as it’s locally grown, fresh, and organic.)

All the rest of you? Well, you might as well just put on a morphsuit and go trick or treating tomorrow with the rest of the charlatans.

Tricia Braid
ICGA/ICMB Communications Director

SUZANNE SOMERS LATEST ROLE: ACTING AS AN EXPERT

I wouldn’t have been one single bit surprised to hear that Suzanne Somers was a plastic surgery expert.  But now, she’s acting as a nutritionist and an animal biologist and THAT surprises the heck out of me.

What exactly is she thinking?

Check out her interview on LIVE! with Regis & Kelly here (the interesting parts start just before 5 minutes in and get even better at 5:30 minutes) and then come on back so I can calm you down.

LIVE!, Somers, corn, grass-fed

Very obviously, she’s watched Food, Inc with their claims that cows get infections from eating corn.  Also just as obvious to me is that she has absolutely no biological education if she honestly thinks that eating corn causes e.coli in the gut.  I thought it was general knowledge that e.coli is spread in feces, but evidentally that’s one of those things that you learn by osmosis growing up on the farm.

Also, just as obviously, she doesn’t read our blog.  Why, just last week, I covered the fact that organic and conventionally produced foods have a lot of differences, but safety isn’t one of them!

The bottom line is, what will you do with this information?  All the housewives and stay at home moms in your town just got a dose of “corn is bad” this morning on their television sets.  Will you step out into your community with the facts?

Consider it a challenge.

Lindsay Mitchell
ICGA/ICMB Marketing Director