TOUR A PIG FARM FROM YOUR COUCH

 

Ever wanted to visit a farm but (a) don’t know any farmers to ask or (b) don’t have any farms near you? Well, Illinois Farm Families (IFF) and the Illinois Pork Producers Association (IPPA) are giving you the opportunity to tour a pig farm without leaving the comfort of your home!

Illinois Farm Families is a collaborative effort between several Illinois ag associations to reach consumers and provide information to non-farmers that have questions and want to learn.

On September 28th, IFF live broadcasted the tour from their Facebook account. The almost 40-minute session gave insight to not only the life of livestock farmer but gave viewers the chance to have their questions answered by livestock and agriculture experts, ranging from concerns about nutrition to light-hearted inquiries about the smell of the farm.

You can watch the video about or check it out on IFF’s Facebook page.

Learn more about Illinois Farm Families.

SOCIAL MEDIA ACCOUNTS TO FOLLOW

If you’re interested in ag and you’d like to have real news and updates delivered to your Facebook or Twitter feed, then these are the social media accounts to follow!

 

Farm Babe

Farm Babe works on the family farm and uses social media to bridge the gap between Farmers & consumers. She is a writer and public speaker for agriculture.

Michelle Miller was once a big city girl and moved to rural Iowa for love. Once there, she learned that her original thoughts of Modern agriculture were very inaccurate (based on mainstream Hollywood media and marketing) and now enjoys debunking myths and spreading facts about REAL Farms from REAL farmers.

CropLife America

If you’re interested in more information about chemicals, why farmers use them, and a more balanced viewpoint, CropLife America is your stop.  CLA’s member companies produce, sell and distribute virtually all the crop protection and biotechnology products used by American farmers.

CLA is dedicated to supporting responsible stewardship of our products to promote the health and well-being of people and the environment, and to promote increasingly responsible, science-driven legislation and regulation of pesticides.

The Pollinator Partnership

We protect the habitats of managed and native pollinating animals vital to our incredibly vibrant North American ecosystems and agriculture. (Pollinating animals are responsible for an estimated one out of every third bite of food and over 75% of all flowering plants.) 

Dairy Carrie

I never thought I’d be a dairy farmer. I grew up in Madison, WI with no real ties to agriculture. I WAS the average American, generations removed from the farm. Then one day when I was 15 I met a guy…and started dating his friend. Fast forward several years and more questionable dating choices and I married the guy I met all those years ago. He wasn’t a dairy farmer (at the time) but his parents were.

My background was in sales and marketing, but my love of animals drew me to trying out farm life shortly after we got married. It stuck and I found out that I was born to be a caretaker of cows and the land.

Waterways Council Inc

Because we talk about needing upgraded locks and dams A LOT and these guys are the authority on what exactly farmers need, why they need it, and how we’re going to get it.

Waterways Council represents agriculture, the barge industry, and even the conservation community who are all working together to restore our river system to its former commerce and habitat glory.

 GMO Answers

Many of you are interested in GMOs in your food and what impact they might have for you and for the environment.

The goal of GMOAnswers is to make information about GMOs in food and agriculture easier to access and understand. GMOAnswers is committed to answering questions about GMOs — no matter what they are.

 

REGARDLESS OF THE LABEL, DAIRY IS LOCAL

[Originally published from Illinois Farm Families]

Our family has been farming in central Illinois for more than 150 years and shipping our milk to local bottling plants for distribution in surrounding communities. We’re just one of many dairy farms across the country – in fact there are dairy farms in all 50 states shipping milk to neighborhood stores and markets, making dairy a true local food!

So what does it take to bring you some local goodness? Well, every day, regardless of birthdays, weddings, graduations or weather, our alarm sounds long before the sun comes up. We milk our cows twice a day and on average, each cow spends about eight minutes in the milking parlor – five of those minutes with the milking units attached. Our milk is cooled down to 38 degrees until the milk hauler comes to the farm. Then our milk is transported to the Prairie Farms bottling plant in Peoria, Ill. Testing is done for quality and safety before the milk is pasteurized, homogenized and bottled. Milk offers great nutrition with a lean source of protein, Vitamins A, D and calcium, just to name a few.

About 48 hours after the milk leaves our farm, it arrives on your store shelves and then on your dinner table!

We all want to sit around the dinner table and feed our family fresh food grown and raised by local farmers. It’s a concept that has recently been rebranded as “farm to table” but has actually been around for a very long time. On my family’s dairy farm, we are proud to say that with our without a “local” label, we have been providing the highest quality milk for our community for more than five generations. So, pour yourself a cold glass of milk or enjoy a heaping bowl of ice cream and know it came from a local farmer just a few days earlier.

MARY FABER

Mary raises dairy cattle and grain with her husband, Jesse, and two children in central Illinois. Mary’s great-grandfather started the dairy farm over 150 years ago with just a handful of cows. Today, her family continues to live and farm on those original acres. Farming is a history and a passion for Mary and her family!

SHOWING STOCK OR STAYING SOCIAL?

Without fail Father’s Day weekend includes two things in my house, a trip to the golf course with friends, their son’s, and my brother for my dad and a trip to the local fairgrounds for the annual local FFA chapter’s livestock show for me. The show is held in remembrance of a young man who passed away far too young. I was too young then to remember much about that time, but I know the family, and I will never miss a chance to support them.

Just like every year for the past six or so, I knew my job without being asked. I was to join the announcer at the stand, help keep track of what was going on and make sure the premiums got handed out to the correct people. As I walked up the show ring being wet with a sprinkler to help settle the dust, I recognized familiar members of the community setting up for their roles as well. It was comforting to be greeted by the people who had watched me grow up at those very fair grounds. I had moved a couple hours away for grad school, yet none of us thought twice about me coming home for the show.

Before long kids and animals filled the ring and our jobs started. Parents held animals for their child in the holding pen so their son or daughter could switch animals between classes. To me, this was all too familiar. I had done this all at 4-H and FFA shows for most of my life. I really hadn’t aged out of the programs that long ago and since then I have volunteered. Suddenly, this show, in particular, had new meaning to me. This is where small town support stood true.

Loyal alumni supported not only their FFA chapter but the family who had lost a beloved son so long ago. Despite the heat that had the men working the show ring sweating, I got the chills. How had nearly twenty years passed yet community support had never wavered? Then it hit me, this is a small town and that is what we do.

While the kids were busy in the ring learning the valuable lessons that could only be learned by handling livestock, the adults helping demonstrated just what those values looked like matured. The students learned about loyalty, hard work, trust, cooperation, manners, and so much more. I felt I was stuck somewhere between the two groups. I’m not ready to call myself an adult at 22 but I certainly was more mature than a high school aged kid pushing a pig around the ring. It didn’t really matter what age category I belonged to, I belonged in that small town that supported the FFA chapter and family that meant so much to me.

What was the show really about? Were we showing livestock or were we upholding social values that had been instilled in us long ago as a showman.

Shelby Carlson
IL Corn Intern

GRILLING WEEK:GRILLED CITRUS SEASONED TILAPIA

As we officially head into summer, enjoy the recipes of grilling week!  We’ll be featuring opportunities for you to get more delicious pork, beef, and chicken into your diet and sharing some fun facts about livestock farming in Illinois & and the U.S.!

Fun Fact: Globally, aquaculture supplies more that 50 percent of all seafood produced for human consumption – that percentage has been and will continue to rise.  Conventional wisdom holds that traditional fisheries are producing near their maximum capacity and that future increases in seafood production must come largely from aquaculture.

Today’s Tip: Use a grill for foods that might fall through the grill rack or are too cumbersome to turn over one by one (vegetables, fish, tofu, fruits, etc.).

Today’s Recipe: Grilling Week: Citrus Seasoned Tilapia

What You Need:

What To Do:

  1. Mix butter, juices, seasoned salt, parsley and pepper in small bowl until well blended. Place fish fillets in center of large sheet of heavy-duty aluminum foil or grill pan. Brush with butter mixture.
  2. Grill over medium heat 12 to 15 minutes or until fish flakes easily with a fork. Sprinkle with additional seasoned salt, if desired.

Lindsay Mitchell
ICGA/ICMB Marketing Director

GRILLING WEEK: GRILLED CHICKEN SANDWICHES WITH PESTO, BRIE, AND ARUGULA

As we officially head into summer, enjoy the recipes of grilling week!  We’ll be featuring opportunities for you to get more delicious pork, beef, and chicken into your diet and sharing some fun facts about livestock farming in Illinois!

Fun Fact: A poultry farm worker who separates chicks into males and females is known as the sexer, and can separate 1,000 chicks per hour with almost 100% accuracy.

Today’s Tip: Even on a clean grill, lean foods may stick when placed directly on the rack. Reduce sticking by oiling your hot grill rack with a vegetable oil-soaked paper towel: hold it with tongs and rub it over the rack. (Do not use cooking spray on a hot grill.)

Today’s Recipe: Grilled Chicken Sandwiches with Pesto, Brie, and Arugula

What You’ll Need:

1 pound thin cut chicken cutlets
1/4 cup olive oil
2 tablespoons lemon juice
1 clove garlic, minced
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground pepper

8 slices crusty sourdough bread
1/4 cup basil pesto (may use purchased)
1/4 cup olive oil
1 large tomato
4 ounces Brie, thinly sliced
1 cup packed baby arugula (a good handful)

What You Do:

  1. Combine all ingredients for marinade and pour into a plastic Ziploc bag. Add chicken, seal, and marinate for at least 30 minutes.
  2. Heat grill on high. Add chicken, grill for 2-3 minutes, turn, and grill for another 2-3 minutes or until chicken registers 160 degrees F on an instant-read thermometer. Remove and reserve.
  3. Spread each piece of bread with 1/2 tablespoon of pesto. Slice the tomato into 8 slices. Place chicken on four of the bread slices. Top chicken with Brie slices, arugula, and 2 tomato slices. Top with prepared bread slices, pesto side toward the tomato.
  4. Brush the outside of each sandwich with about 1/2 tablespoon of olive oil. Place on grill, reduce heat to medium, and grill for 2-3 minutes per side or until bread is nicely toasted with grill marks. Cheese should be melted.
  5. Remove from heat, cut each sandwich in half, and serve. Serves 4.

Nutrition Information, Per Serving:
940 calories; 38 g fat; 11 g saturated fat; 99 g carbohydrate; 6 g sugars; 52 g protein

Lindsay Mitchell
ICGA/ICMB Marketing Director