GET READY FOR THE SPRING SEMESTER WITH AG MAGS!

Repost from ilcorn.org

Illinois Ag in the Classroom provides teachers important, interesting and even fun classroom curriculum on agriculture for free!  Make sure the teachers in your life have incorporated an Ag Mag into their spring 2018 curriculum and get those requests to your county ag literacy coordinator today!

Ag Mags are 4-page, colorful agricultural magazines for kids. They contain information about agriculture, bright pictures, classroom activities and agricultural careers.

Many Ag Mags are interactive.  They are set up for smart board usage in the classroom and give teachers opportunities to engage their students with various videos, online articles, and real-world applications to help students understand how what they are learning in the classroom makes a difference in real-world discussions.

Best of all, Ag Mags are designed to meet specific learning standards.  As an example, the Corn Ag Mag includes the following note:

This Ag Mag complements, and can be connected to, the following educational standards:

Common Core State Standards:

  • ELA-Literacy – RI.4.2; RI.4.4; RI4.7; RI.4:10; W.4.7-4.9; SL.4.1; SL.4.4; L4.1; L4.6
  • Mathematics – 4.MD; 5.MD
  • Next Generation Science Standards:
  • Interdependent Relationships in Ecosystems: 3-LS4-3; Energy: 4-ESS3-1; Structure,
  • Function, and Information Processing: 4-LS1; Structure and Properties of Matter: 5-PS1-3;
  • Structure and Properties of Matter: 5-PS1-4

IL Social Science Standards:

  • Human-Environment Interaction: Place, Regions and Culture: SS.G.3.4; Human Population: SS.G.3.4;
  • Exchange and Markets: SS.EC.2.4; Causation and Argumentation: SS.H.3.4

There are tons of other free resources available to teachers to incorporate agriculture education into their classrooms AND meet state learning standards.  For more information, check out the Ag in the Classroom website here.

ILLINOIS FARM FAMILIES: LEARN THE LABEL LINGO

Originally published on Illinois Farm Families

In a world filled with choice, a food label can be like a beacon of fluorescent light in the middle of a grocery aisle. Nutritional content, ingredients – this is information that helps. But then there are labels that mislead or confuse rather than clarify, hindering your ability to pick out healthy, nutritious food for you and your family – no matter the claim.

We want to help you wade through the words. So when labels lie, you know the facts behind how your food is grown and raised.

TOP POSTS OF 2017 #4: WHAT DO FARMERS WEAR?

[Originally published: May 18, 2017]

As farmers and agriculturalists, we do things a little differently. We work long hours, we work extremely hard, and we aren’t afraid to get our hands dirty. And when it comes to fashion, well, we’re in a league of our own.

We always have something on our boots. Sometimes it’s mud, sometimes it’s manure. And sometimes, we aren’t really sure what’s on our boots. But it will rub off soon.

Photo Credit: Forbes

We all have those jeans that are worn in just the right amount. They’re faded, rough around the edges, and the most comfortable jeans we own. Don’t be surprised if we wear them for a week.

Just like our jeans, we all have a favorite hat. It may be a brand hat or your family’s farm’s hat, but we all have one that fits better than the others. Whether we’re 5 or 50, we just love that hat.

Sometimes we work all day and still have errands to run in town. We are not afraid to stop into the bank or the local grocery store. And if we smell, we’re sorry. It’s just a part of the job.

Some people carry bags, but farmers carry side cutters or pliers. You just never know when something is going to need snipping or tightening.

In the cold winters, our livestock still needs feeding. Coveralls are the perfect solution. Our clothes underneath stay clean and we stay warm. They are a fashion statement of farmers everywhere.

Some colleges with equine programs will have riding classes during the day. You will be able to hear me coming down the hall with my spurs. Hopefully, it isn’t too disrupting!

Some of the brands we wear are unknown to a lot of people. We love the look and the quality, unfortunately, if we outgrow them, it makes it hard to sell to someone!

Many people I know, myself included, have gone off the beaten path when it comes to music. Walking into a livestock show or traveling to different states, you see many different band t-shirts you may have never heard of. Jason Isbell, Cross Canadian Ragweed, William Clark Green. You may not know them now, but you should. You won’t be disappointed.

A must-have for livestock girls everywhere is the Miss Me jean. It’s very rare to go to a livestock show and not see bling!

If you’re walking around a livestock show, you will see hundreds of pairs of Twisted X boots. They are original and they are comfy. It also makes it easy to spot a livestock kid on campuses, allowing for easy start up conversations.

T-shirts, hats, and sweatshirts are full of different logos. Some are John Deere, some are Case, but others are not as recognizable. Every farm has a logo, and we wear the heck out of them. Most people don’t understand it, but when we see one we recognize, we feel a little pride.

Every farm kid has that old beat up t-shirt that they didn’t want to get rid of. So, they cut the sleeves off and made it more breathable and easy to work in.

When we go out, we channel our inner George Strait. Sometimes, our dress clothes and work clothes look the same. The dress clothes are a touch cleaner and not so rough.

Not everyone chews Skoal, but those that do usually have a ring left on their jeans. It always goes right back to the same spot, and if it isn’t there, you notice it.

Photo Credit: Wild Wyoming Woman

Our back door is full of different kinds of boots. A couple of pairs are the same because we loved the first pair so much. Some pairs are nice and some are worn in. But each pair has a purpose and we can’t live without them

Our clothes may be different, our way of life may be different, but that doesn’t mean we aren’t relatable. Don’t be afraid to strike up a conversation. You’ll be surprised how much we can learn from each other.

Jess Manthe
Iowa State University

TOP POSTS OF 2017 #3: A FARMER’S DAY VS A BUSINESSMAN’S DAY

[Originally published: October 16, 2017]

Corn husks and dust flying around in the air, the fresh smell of soil being turned over, and farm machinery is being spotted on every highway and backroad. If you haven’t guessed already, harvest time is in full swing. Sometimes it is quite easy for us to overlook what a day in the life of a farmer is like, especially during this time of year. As an individual that is not involved in the agriculture industry, it may be easy to not see how much a farmer’s life can vary compared to the average business person’s, particularly throughout the fall.

The average business person spends their eight hour work day sitting in a cubicle working on their computer. Mounds of paperwork lay on their desk just waiting to be completed. They eat lunch with their boss and wear office clothes all day long. The typical business person also talks on a phone throughout the day. After work, they may head home to their own spouse and kids to sit down for a family dinner. A non-farmer may even sit down with their kids and help them with their homework at the kitchen table. They may also go to different recreational events, such as a pumpkin patch or a football game, on the weekends and enjoy their time off of work.

Meanwhile, the average farmer watches the sun rise and set every day from the seat of a combine, tractor or semi. During a twelve or more hour work day, a farmer uses a computer in the cab of his or her farm machinery while wearing jeans and a shirt that are meant to get covered in dirt and grease. Lunch for a farmer is usually simple and easy to eat while continuing on with harvest. The most common type of communication used by a farmer throughout the day is a CB radio that allows them to easily talk to other people that are helping harvest the crop. As the day gets closer to the end, a farmer will enjoy a nice meal with his or her family on a tailgate. A farmer’s child may even climb up in the cab and ask to drive or simply just ride in the “buddy” seat. A farmer may also take their child for a ride in the semi as another load of grain gets taken into the grain elevator. There are no weekends off for a farmer during harvest unless Mother Nature calls for a rain delay, but even then a farmer will still find something that needs to be done.

Although their days may fulfill similar tasks as the average business person, a farmer makes several sacrifices to assure that the job of feeding the world is being accomplished. So, as you are driving to work or running errands make sure to wave and share the roads with every farmer that you see. Being involved in production agriculture isn’t an easy task and a lot of behind the scenes actions get overlooked. As you sit on the couch and watch TV tonight, remember that 2% of the population is just clocking out and getting ready to do it all again tomorrow.

Sierra Day
Lake Land College

TOP POSTS OF 2017 #2: WHAT IF YOUNG PEOPLE QUIT COMING BACK TO FARM?

[Originally published: October 17, 2017]

When I was growing up, I was told I could be anything I wanted to be. A doctor, a lawyer, a teacher, an astronaut…  But only a few kids ever mentioned being a farmer.

Prior to 1990, most farmers and ranchers were under the age of 45. As the years go on, most farmer and ranchers are OVER the age of 45, with less and less new blood coming in. The problem we are facing is we have an aging farming population. If left unchecked, this could threaten our ability to produce the food we need.

So why is it that the younger generations are not wanting to come back to the farm?

  • Youth want to be better educated to get good jobs.
  • Farming is mentally and physically exhausting.
  • Changing norms.
  • “It’s too expensive and risky.”

Farming has become a very risky business. There are many costs a farmer has to pay before receiving a check. The price of land has gone up, equipment prices are always on the rise, input prices have gone up, and commodity prices have been seeing ups and downs. Not to mention there is always that chance of droughts or floods.  It is hard work being a farmer.

The ups and downs of farming are nothing new. Young people just do not want to gamble all of their time and money into something that involves such great risk.

Like President John F. Kennedy once said, “The farmer is the only man in our economy who buys everything retail, sells everything wholesale, and pays freight both ways.” It was a true statement then, and it certainly is a true statement still today.

Right now we are facing a growing population around the world. The current population of 7.3 billion is expected to hit 8.5 billion by 2030 and 9.7 billion by 2050. We need more young men and women coming back to the farm more now than ever. Small farms are what grows America!

  • What if a college graduate comes back to the farm, with student loans and can’t make enough money to pay them back?
  • What if a young farmer loses his farm because he cannot afford to pay his bills?
  • What if young people quit coming back to the farm?
  • What if we don’t have enough food to feed the growing population?

Sara Pieper
Western Illinois University

HOW TO BECOME A FARMER: LIVESTOCK COULD BE KEY

Periodically, I review the list of terms that bring people to our blog.  Among the front-runners, every single month, are searches of people wanting to become farmers.

“How to become farmer”
“How to start farming”
“Can I buy a farm”

I’m guessing what they eventually find is that it’s super hard to “get started” in farming.  You don’t just quit your job one day and decide that you want to be a farmer because the startup income you’d need is prohibitively large.

To start farming, a young person typically needs to begin working for a farmer and learning the ropes.  After all, there’s so much about taking for the land and animals that is intuitive and based on years and years of experience.  A first-time farmer needs a few years of experience under his or her belt AND the wisdom to listen to his farmer employer and learn from her experience as well.

But after you’ve put your time in, building a livestock barn could be the key to becoming a farmer if that’s what your heart desires.

In the pig farming industry, there are several larger companies that are often looking for “pig spaces,” or barns to house their pigs and farmers to care for those pigs.  If you are interested in starting a farm and you can get the bank to loan you the money to build a barn, you just might be able to secure a contract with a larger company to fill that barn and guarantee you enough income to get started.

That’s exactly what Chad and Julia Krogman did when they opened their first wean-to-finish pig barn earlier this month.  (Wean-to-finish means that they will take piglets into their barn as soon as they are weaned, and the pigs will grow and live there until they are harvested for meat.)

Chad and Julia grew up and rural communities and have worked on farms and in the ag industry their entire lives.  They have saved their pennies and eventually moved some pigs into an existing empty barn in their community.  Further saving meant that they were able to build their own barn.

“We enjoy raising and caring for livestock and the environment. As first-generation farmers, we see raising hogs as an opportunity to work in an agricultural realm that is very capital intensive.  We feel blessed to have the opportunity to pursue our goals in agriculture and desire to be good stewards of what we’ve been given,” said Chad.

So, if you are really interested in becoming a farmer, first find some seasonal work for a farmer and learn a few things.  Then, consider livestock.  It’s hard work that never quits, but worth it for a life you love.

Lindsay Mitchell
ICGA/ICMB Marketing Director

A YEAR-LONG FARMING SERIES

A new year begins next week. Did you know farmers are already thinking and planning for the next crop year? However, they’re not the only ones. Farm family members all have a part to play in the ecosystem of their family farm. Read a series that explores the farming year from a different perspective – from the spouse of a farmer.

A Year in the Life of a Farmer:

January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November

TAKE A VIRTUAL TOUR OF A FARMING SEASON

It’s the day after Christmas and we’re already thinking about the next farming season. Want to know what goes into a farming season in just a few short minutes? Check out virtual video series on farming!

#360Corn is a series of 360-degree videos featuring our own Illinois corn farmer, Justin Durdan.  Justin lets us plant corn with him, spray for pests, fertilize those little baby corn plants, and even harvest and sell his crop – all while we can look 360 degrees around the tractor cab, the farm and even the field.

Check out the entire experience here.

ETHANOL & YOUR CAR: A PRIMER

Have you ever stopped to think about the science that goes behind the gasoline that drives your car? If you’re anything like me- gears, engines, and any sort of chemistry don’t make the slightest bit of sense. When I go to the gas station, I swipe my card to get my ‘fuel points’, then always get the gas that is the cheapest. But, I’ve never really sat and thought about what makes up gasoline. How does this make my car run?

We’ll start simple. Corn is fermented to create a gasoline mixture. This is called ethanol. Most gasoline is made of 10% ethanol, and the majority of US cars can run on this amount. But, some cars are now being produced that can run on 100% ethanol fuel, which is better for the environment and uses less energy. Ethanol is a renewable source, unlike regular gasoline.

PEMBROKE PINES, FL – NOVEMBER 15: Gas pumps with a sign indicating the gas is containing up to 10 % ethanol are seen at Victory gas station on November 15, 2013 in Pembroke Pines, Florida. Today, the federal Environmental Protection Agency announced a proposal to ease an annual requirement for ethanol in gasoline. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Ethanol is also known to have high amounts of octane. Octane is the power that makes your car go. The more octane you have, the more power there is for your car to run. Higher blends of ethanol offer more octane for the same amount of money. The Department of Energy states that having higher octane fuels are required for larger engines or ones that use more force.

The oil companies obviously want you to pay the ‘big dollars’ for high-dollar ‘aromatics’, which is a petroleum-based synthetic octane enhancer. They increase the octane, but are extremely harmful to the environment and are very expensive.

But, this is why we have ethanol.

The higher the ethanol content in your gasoline, the higher the amount of octane you have. This increases the power in your car, while also helping the environment. If car manufacturer increases the engine capacity of cars to be able to handle more ethanol content in cars, this can really help our environment. We can stop unnecessary greenhouse gas emissions and increase the efficiency levels in our vehicles.

This only goes to show that agriculture really does “drive” everything forward. Ethanol is cheaper than gasoline, so why not try to produce more vehicles that have the capacity to not only help the environment but help us save some money at the pump every week.

Ashley Hauptman
Illinois State University

YOUNG PERSON IN AG: KATIE BURNS

If you see Katie she probably has a camera in hand ready to snap that great candid photo of FFA members livestock judging or giving a speech. See, that’s her passion. Telling the story of agriculture and all it entails. Connecting the producers to consumers. Her passion for agriculture started pretty much at birth, coming from an agriculture community and family. Which makes her a great Young Person in Ag.

  1. What is your ag background?

I am originally from Coulterville, Illinois in Randolph County. There, along with my family, we grew corn, soybeans, wheat, as well as registered Polled Herefords. I was able to show those Herefords at the local, state, and national level.

  1. What were some of your high school experiences/involvement in ag?

I was a 10 year 4-H member and a 4 year FFA member. I attended Sparta High School. I was an officer for both my chapter and section in FFA. I was fortunate enough to receive both my State and American FFA Degree there. I was also very involved in the Illinois Junior Hereford Association and was the 2013 Illinois Hereford queen and went on to compete for National Queen and I received 2nd runner-up in Miss Congeniality.

  1. What college did you attend and what is your major?

I first attended Lake Land College where I was on the Livestock Judging team. After LLC I went on to the University of Illinois where I was on the judging team there as well. I majored in Agriculture Science and Leadership Education.

  1. What was your involvement at the U of I?

The Livestock Judging team kept me pretty busy, but I was also on the Meat Evaluation team. I also was a part of Sigma Alpha as the Ag in the Classroom Chair, Ag Ed Club, and Hoof and Horn Club.

  1. What were some of your internships?

For the first two years of college, I went back to the family farm and worked because that was where I was needed. In between my junior and senior year, I interned for Gale Cunningham at WYXY Classic 99.1 as a farm broadcasting intern.

  1. What is your current job?

I am the Communications Specialists for the Illinois FFA Center. I wear a lot of hats with that position. Not only do I work with the Illinois Association FFA, but I also work with FFA Alumni, FFA Foundation, IACCAI, PAS, IAVAT, ILCAE, and ICAE. With that, I have learned to wear many hats. I am responsible for the communications and promotion of all those organizations.  That is anything from up keeping their websites, posting for their social media pages, and designing graphics for them. Another part of my job is for the Foundation. The Foundation helps pay for all those entities I mentioned and fund things that we do. I work with businesses in Illinois and surrounding areas to establish relationships that are then used for donations to help fund all the different leadership and CDE events that we do for FFA members.

  1. What is your dream job?

I can’t pinpoint one dream job that I want to do for the rest of my life. However, my dream is to tell the story of agriculture and the people involved in it. I was very lucky that I was born into this industry and surrounded with people in the agriculture industry. But I want to tell those stories and experiences to other people who maybe aren’t in the industry and connect them to what we are trying to accomplish.

  1. Do you have any mentors?

Growing up my parents and grandparents had a big impact on my life. They allowed me to have many opportunities like go and showing all over the nation in cattle shows. In college, I had different people who were always there with advice and encouragement. My judging coach at Lake Land, Ryan Orrick really believed in me. A small-town girl from Southern Illinois who had never given reasons before. I really credit Livestock Judging to much of my success. At the U of I, Dr. Korte and Dr. Keating were both two people who really helped me develop my leadership skills.

  1. Do you remember anything that has really changed in the agriculture industry?

There are two things that instantly come to mind whenever I hear that question. When I was little riding in the tractor with my dad and grandpa, we didn’t have GPS in the combines and tractors. The technology movement has been amazing. I am so excited to see what it will continue to do. More at home in Illinois, I think one thing that changed many farmers was the drought of 2012. It didn’t rain the entire month of July. I remember digging out ponds and our corn that year didn’t make anything. It was really a hard thing to overcome. But it is so good to see the bounce back that our industry can and has made. 

  1. You work for and advocate for FFA members every day, do you have any advice for them to become more involved or those who are thinking of going into the agriculture industry as a career?

I know it is so cliché and obvious, but get out of your comfort zone. You don’t know if you like something until you try. Take advantage of all the opportunities that are presented to you. There were many times I could have said no to an opportunity, but if I had they would not have helped me become the person I am today.

  1. What do you think sets the agriculture industry apart from other industries?

We as an industry can network and make connections, which will only make our industry better. Meeting those people at conferences and workshops and exchanging ideas is what is going to keep our industry thriving.

Lacie Butler
Lake Land College