EXHAUST EMISSIONS LINKED TO HUMAN HEALTH THREATS

According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in the U.S. there are 45 million people living, working or attending school within 300 feet of a major road, airport or railroad.3 Hundreds of studies have linked air pollution to a wide range of human health threats from low birth weights to brain cancer, from asthma to leukemia.  For example:

  • A Center for Disease Control review of seven studies involving over 8,000 children found that children diagnosed with leukemia were 50% more likely to live near busy roads than children without leukemia.4
  • A UCLA study linked autism in children with prenatal exposure to traffic pollution.5
  • A study from the Harvard School of Public Health found that women exposed to high levels of air pollution in their third trimester of pregnancy may be twice as likely to give birth to a child with autism6
  • A study of 60 million Americans—about 97% of people age 65 and older in the U.S.—shows that long-term exposure to airborne fine particulate matter and ozone increases the risk of premature death, even when that exposure is at levels below the National Ambient Air Quality Standards. 7
  • University of Colorado researchers have warned that benzene, toluene and xylene may disrupt the hormone system in humans beyond levels deemed “safe” by federal standards.8
  • According to the University of Southern California, at least 8 percent of the more than 300,000 cases of childhood asthma in Los Angeles County can be attributed to traffic-related pollution at homes within 75 meters of a busy roadway.9
  • A study involving the VA Saint Louis Health Care System in Missouri estimates that about 14% of diabetes in the world—or about 1 in 7 cases—occurs because of higher levels of air pollution, primarily due to particulate matter. 10

These are sobering statistics—and there are hundreds more.  But there is good news:  There is an alternative octane enhancer that makes our fuel safer and our air cleaner—ethanol.

Leave a Reply