DO FARMERS HAVE A CHOICE IN WHAT THEY PLANT ON THEIR FARMS?

Yes, just like consumers have choices in what they buy at the store, farmers choose what they want to plant in their fields. They spend a lot of time researching, reading, meeting and listening to industry experts to determine what’s best for their farms.

For more perspective on this issue, read Illinois farmer Paul Taylor’s perspective on how and why he chooses to grow both GM and non-GM crops on his farm.

ALL EGGS ARE ANTIBIOTIC FREE, HORMONE FREE, AND NON GMO

Want at least one worry you can put aside in the new year?  Buy any eggs you want.  They are all perfectly healthy for you and your family.

The use of hormones in eggs is prohibited by the U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA).  No matter what the label says, any eggs you purchase in the U.S. will be hormone free.

For the sake of review, a hormone is a substance produced by an organism that stimulates specific cells or tissues into action.  In some industries, hormones can be used to stimulate growth of an animal, but in minute amounts.

FDA regulations also require that any laying hens receiving antibiotics have their eggs diverted from food consumption markets.  Most hens that are ill enough to need antibiotics would not produce eggs anyway!  The egg industry does not use antibiotics on a continual basis.

Summary?  All the eggs available to you are antibiotic free, no matter the label.

Finally, all eggs are non-GMO.  There are only nine genetically modified foods approved for human consumption, and eggs are not one of them.  You don’t even have to worry about the corn fed to the chickens!  Research confirms that any GM food in the chicken feed is not passed on to the egg itself.

Seeing eggs labeled as natural and non-GMO? That’s another marketing tactic. According to the USDA, all shell eggs are natural and eggs are not a genetically modified food. Research confirms that any GM food in the hen feed is not passed into the egg itself.

For more answers to your questions about buying the healthiest eggs, check out this article!

#TBT: TRUE LIFE: I LIVE ON A FARM

[Originally published: January 24, 2017]

1-24-17deal-family-%ef%80%a7-family-session-55
1-24-17deal-family-%ef%80%a7-family-session-56Let me tell you a bit about our quaint little farm… We live about a quarter mile off a narrow, but paved, country road. Generally, the only traffic we have going by our house are our neighbors, to whom we always give a “country wave” when we pass. It’s quiet – aside from the cows mooing at dinnertime and birds chirping at 4 a.m. Our house, barns, and shop sit atop a slight hill which allows us to see for miles around. We are surrounded on all sides by green pasture followed by corn and bean fields. Our dog can run freely, our farm cats come and go as they please, and my kids have ample spaces to play and explore. It’s peaceful, it’s picturesque, and it’s perf—– Actually, no. It is FAR from perfect…

Growing up in a town of 850 people, I thought I understood country living. But no. There are many, MANY aspects of living on a farm which I had no idea of. Let me enlighten you to a few:

Farm Smells – Sure, everyone knows farms can be kind of stinky. However, the level of stench drastically depends on both the type of farm and the time of year. We have cattle. So we deal with the smell of cow poop daily. The surprising thing is that the smell changes depending on what the cows eat. The direction of the wind also impacts the level of stink you have coming at you. Some days it is so stinky that it’s actually counterproductive to open up the windows to air out the house! Other bad farm smells make it inside on my farmer’s clothing. Smells like diesel fuel, welding, chemicals, and old rotting silage all plague my laundry room.

Garbage – While garbage pickup is an option where I live, it’s pricey. Country folks who don’t have the luxury of regular garbage pickup have other options such as a dumpster, burning their garbage on the farm, or transporting it to the city dump themselves. Household garbage is handled a bit differently from when I lived in town though. Instead of just putting any old thing in the trash, it’s divided out a bit better. Lots of farm families I know will collect their compostable kitchen waste and either put it in their compost pile that they’ll later use for gardening or just dump it in the cornfield. Recycling is collected and transported to a recycling center in town.

Well Water – Being without city water might be the most life-changing aspect of farm life I face. Some family and neighbors have to be conscious of the amount of water they use based on the depth of their well and recent amounts of precipitation — sometimes your well CAN. RUN. DRY. And that’s a scary thing! Luckily for us, we have a very deep well that’s on the Mohomet Aquafer (ie: a big underground river that will virtually never run dry) and I don’t have to keep track of the amount of laundry I’m doing or make my kids bathe together in 2 inches of water. I should mention that even though we have plenty of water, and it’s safe to drink, we have very hard water with high sulfur and rust contents. We spend a lot of money on softener salt.

Septic Tank – We have a septic tank. Sometimes it gets full. Enough said.

Power Outages – In my experience with country living, the power outages always seem to happen in the dead of winter. City people deal with power outages too, but in the country when there’s a power outage, it is much more difficult for the power company to come repair the lines during an ice storm on slick, unsalted country roads than in town, meaning our power can be out for days instead of hours. This is when our scenic hill and drafty old farmhouse don’t get along. Without power, our propane furnace is unable to ignite and the cold winter wind whips through our home. I’m talking a breeze through our power outlets kind of draft. And let me tell you! It only takes one (freezing) time to realize that your generator is insufficient and can’t keep up with the amount of power needed. I should mention, though, that some of our generator’s power is allocated to our cattle – can’t have the automatic waterer freezing up!

Liquid Propane – Since we’re not on a natural gas line, like in town, we have to purchase liquid propane (aka LP) to heat our home and run some appliances. LP is delivered by a gas truck which drags a hose through your yard to fill a big ugly tank sitting in your kids’ play area. The tank usually holds approx. 500-1000 gal. of propane. The price fluctuates similarly to the way gasoline or corn prices change. Time of year also affects the price, making it cheaper in the summer and more expensive in the winter. Propane is definitely more costly than natural gas but it is essential for heating our home. Some people also use propane for their stove, clothes dryer, and water heater.

Sometimes it really feels like I’m totally living off the grid in central IL, but as much of an inconvenience some of these things are, I truly wouldn’t trade it in for a city life any day of the week! I take a little pride in knowing that should there be a zombie apocalypse, we could survive on our own power, water, food, tools, and toilet!

Deal_Ashley

Ashley Deal
ICGA/ICMB Membership

NAFTA IS IMPORTANT FOR ALL NORTH AMERICANS!

Maybe you’ve never considered what the North American Free Trade Agreement has meant for you.  Maybe you’ve never considered what it means for others in our country and all over our continent.

To name a few, NAFTA means Mexicans have corn for tortillas and porkfor carnitas.  It means Canada has cleaner air because they use U.S. ethanol for fuel.

Read more.  I hope what you learn will surprise you!

SPENDING MORE FOR HORMONE FREE?

Did you realize that you don’t need to?

Per federal law, hormone use is not allowed for growth promotion in hog farming or poultry farming.  Hormones are sometimes used and allowed for reproductive purposes in hogs.

Therefore, grocery store labels reading “hormone free” on packages of chicken and pork are just marketing ploys for consumers to purchase these products.

In cattle farming, farmers are allowed to use growth hormones.  The hormones are injected under the skin of the ear where the hormones dissolve slowly over time.  This is not all that different from women using an IUD (slow release hormone) to control pregnancy!

Growth hormones are used to produce leaner meats more efficiently.  They are in the ear because the ear is never used or consumed.

If this still makes you nervous, here’s a visual representation of the amount of hormones in the steak you might have on your plate.

If we use one M&M to represent the amount of nanograms of hormones in our foods, then a three-ounce steak would have half an M&M, while three ounces of cabbage would have a mason jar full.

There really is no need to pay more for hormone-free protein.  If you feel better and safer about it, then buy it!  But buy it with your eyes wide open.

 

GET READY FOR THE SPRING SEMESTER WITH AG MAGS!

Repost from ilcorn.org

Illinois Ag in the Classroom provides teachers important, interesting and even fun classroom curriculum on agriculture for free!  Make sure the teachers in your life have incorporated an Ag Mag into their spring 2018 curriculum and get those requests to your county ag literacy coordinator today!

Ag Mags are 4-page, colorful agricultural magazines for kids. They contain information about agriculture, bright pictures, classroom activities and agricultural careers.

Many Ag Mags are interactive.  They are set up for smart board usage in the classroom and give teachers opportunities to engage their students with various videos, online articles, and real-world applications to help students understand how what they are learning in the classroom makes a difference in real-world discussions.

Best of all, Ag Mags are designed to meet specific learning standards.  As an example, the Corn Ag Mag includes the following note:

This Ag Mag complements, and can be connected to, the following educational standards:

Common Core State Standards:

  • ELA-Literacy – RI.4.2; RI.4.4; RI4.7; RI.4:10; W.4.7-4.9; SL.4.1; SL.4.4; L4.1; L4.6
  • Mathematics – 4.MD; 5.MD
  • Next Generation Science Standards:
  • Interdependent Relationships in Ecosystems: 3-LS4-3; Energy: 4-ESS3-1; Structure,
  • Function, and Information Processing: 4-LS1; Structure and Properties of Matter: 5-PS1-3;
  • Structure and Properties of Matter: 5-PS1-4

IL Social Science Standards:

  • Human-Environment Interaction: Place, Regions and Culture: SS.G.3.4; Human Population: SS.G.3.4;
  • Exchange and Markets: SS.EC.2.4; Causation and Argumentation: SS.H.3.4

There are tons of other free resources available to teachers to incorporate agriculture education into their classrooms AND meet state learning standards.  For more information, check out the Ag in the Classroom website here.

ILLINOIS FARM FAMILIES: LEARN THE LABEL LINGO

Originally published on Illinois Farm Families

In a world filled with choice, a food label can be like a beacon of fluorescent light in the middle of a grocery aisle. Nutritional content, ingredients – this is information that helps. But then there are labels that mislead or confuse rather than clarify, hindering your ability to pick out healthy, nutritious food for you and your family – no matter the claim.

We want to help you wade through the words. So when labels lie, you know the facts behind how your food is grown and raised.