DO FARMERS HAVE A CHOICE IN WHAT THEY PLANT ON THEIR FARMS?

Yes, just like consumers have choices in what they buy at the store, farmers choose what they want to plant in their fields. They spend a lot of time researching, reading, meeting and listening to industry experts to determine what’s best for their farms.

For more perspective on this issue, read Illinois farmer Paul Taylor’s perspective on how and why he chooses to grow both GM and non-GM crops on his farm.

ALL EGGS ARE ANTIBIOTIC FREE, HORMONE FREE, AND NON GMO

Want at least one worry you can put aside in the new year?  Buy any eggs you want.  They are all perfectly healthy for you and your family.

The use of hormones in eggs is prohibited by the U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA).  No matter what the label says, any eggs you purchase in the U.S. will be hormone free.

For the sake of review, a hormone is a substance produced by an organism that stimulates specific cells or tissues into action.  In some industries, hormones can be used to stimulate growth of an animal, but in minute amounts.

FDA regulations also require that any laying hens receiving antibiotics have their eggs diverted from food consumption markets.  Most hens that are ill enough to need antibiotics would not produce eggs anyway!  The egg industry does not use antibiotics on a continual basis.

Summary?  All the eggs available to you are antibiotic free, no matter the label.

Finally, all eggs are non-GMO.  There are only nine genetically modified foods approved for human consumption, and eggs are not one of them.  You don’t even have to worry about the corn fed to the chickens!  Research confirms that any GM food in the chicken feed is not passed on to the egg itself.

Seeing eggs labeled as natural and non-GMO? That’s another marketing tactic. According to the USDA, all shell eggs are natural and eggs are not a genetically modified food. Research confirms that any GM food in the hen feed is not passed into the egg itself.

For more answers to your questions about buying the healthiest eggs, check out this article!

NAFTA IS IMPORTANT FOR ALL NORTH AMERICANS!

Maybe you’ve never considered what the North American Free Trade Agreement has meant for you.  Maybe you’ve never considered what it means for others in our country and all over our continent.

To name a few, NAFTA means Mexicans have corn for tortillas and porkfor carnitas.  It means Canada has cleaner air because they use U.S. ethanol for fuel.

Read more.  I hope what you learn will surprise you!

SPENDING MORE FOR HORMONE FREE?

Did you realize that you don’t need to?

Per federal law, hormone use is not allowed for growth promotion in hog farming or poultry farming.  Hormones are sometimes used and allowed for reproductive purposes in hogs.

Therefore, grocery store labels reading “hormone free” on packages of chicken and pork are just marketing ploys for consumers to purchase these products.

In cattle farming, farmers are allowed to use growth hormones.  The hormones are injected under the skin of the ear where the hormones dissolve slowly over time.  This is not all that different from women using an IUD (slow release hormone) to control pregnancy!

Growth hormones are used to produce leaner meats more efficiently.  They are in the ear because the ear is never used or consumed.

If this still makes you nervous, here’s a visual representation of the amount of hormones in the steak you might have on your plate.

If we use one M&M to represent the amount of nanograms of hormones in our foods, then a three-ounce steak would have half an M&M, while three ounces of cabbage would have a mason jar full.

There really is no need to pay more for hormone-free protein.  If you feel better and safer about it, then buy it!  But buy it with your eyes wide open.

 

GET READY FOR THE SPRING SEMESTER WITH AG MAGS!

Repost from ilcorn.org

Illinois Ag in the Classroom provides teachers important, interesting and even fun classroom curriculum on agriculture for free!  Make sure the teachers in your life have incorporated an Ag Mag into their spring 2018 curriculum and get those requests to your county ag literacy coordinator today!

Ag Mags are 4-page, colorful agricultural magazines for kids. They contain information about agriculture, bright pictures, classroom activities and agricultural careers.

Many Ag Mags are interactive.  They are set up for smart board usage in the classroom and give teachers opportunities to engage their students with various videos, online articles, and real-world applications to help students understand how what they are learning in the classroom makes a difference in real-world discussions.

Best of all, Ag Mags are designed to meet specific learning standards.  As an example, the Corn Ag Mag includes the following note:

This Ag Mag complements, and can be connected to, the following educational standards:

Common Core State Standards:

  • ELA-Literacy – RI.4.2; RI.4.4; RI4.7; RI.4:10; W.4.7-4.9; SL.4.1; SL.4.4; L4.1; L4.6
  • Mathematics – 4.MD; 5.MD
  • Next Generation Science Standards:
  • Interdependent Relationships in Ecosystems: 3-LS4-3; Energy: 4-ESS3-1; Structure,
  • Function, and Information Processing: 4-LS1; Structure and Properties of Matter: 5-PS1-3;
  • Structure and Properties of Matter: 5-PS1-4

IL Social Science Standards:

  • Human-Environment Interaction: Place, Regions and Culture: SS.G.3.4; Human Population: SS.G.3.4;
  • Exchange and Markets: SS.EC.2.4; Causation and Argumentation: SS.H.3.4

There are tons of other free resources available to teachers to incorporate agriculture education into their classrooms AND meet state learning standards.  For more information, check out the Ag in the Classroom website here.

ILLINOIS FARM FAMILIES: LEARN THE LABEL LINGO

Originally published on Illinois Farm Families

In a world filled with choice, a food label can be like a beacon of fluorescent light in the middle of a grocery aisle. Nutritional content, ingredients – this is information that helps. But then there are labels that mislead or confuse rather than clarify, hindering your ability to pick out healthy, nutritious food for you and your family – no matter the claim.

We want to help you wade through the words. So when labels lie, you know the facts behind how your food is grown and raised.

HOW TO BECOME A FARMER: LIVESTOCK COULD BE KEY

Periodically, I review the list of terms that bring people to our blog.  Among the front-runners, every single month, are searches of people wanting to become farmers.

“How to become farmer”
“How to start farming”
“Can I buy a farm”

I’m guessing what they eventually find is that it’s super hard to “get started” in farming.  You don’t just quit your job one day and decide that you want to be a farmer because the startup income you’d need is prohibitively large.

To start farming, a young person typically needs to begin working for a farmer and learning the ropes.  After all, there’s so much about taking for the land and animals that is intuitive and based on years and years of experience.  A first-time farmer needs a few years of experience under his or her belt AND the wisdom to listen to his farmer employer and learn from her experience as well.

But after you’ve put your time in, building a livestock barn could be the key to becoming a farmer if that’s what your heart desires.

In the pig farming industry, there are several larger companies that are often looking for “pig spaces,” or barns to house their pigs and farmers to care for those pigs.  If you are interested in starting a farm and you can get the bank to loan you the money to build a barn, you just might be able to secure a contract with a larger company to fill that barn and guarantee you enough income to get started.

That’s exactly what Chad and Julia Krogman did when they opened their first wean-to-finish pig barn earlier this month.  (Wean-to-finish means that they will take piglets into their barn as soon as they are weaned, and the pigs will grow and live there until they are harvested for meat.)

Chad and Julia grew up and rural communities and have worked on farms and in the ag industry their entire lives.  They have saved their pennies and eventually moved some pigs into an existing empty barn in their community.  Further saving meant that they were able to build their own barn.

“We enjoy raising and caring for livestock and the environment. As first-generation farmers, we see raising hogs as an opportunity to work in an agricultural realm that is very capital intensive.  We feel blessed to have the opportunity to pursue our goals in agriculture and desire to be good stewards of what we’ve been given,” said Chad.

So, if you are really interested in becoming a farmer, first find some seasonal work for a farmer and learn a few things.  Then, consider livestock.  It’s hard work that never quits, but worth it for a life you love.

Lindsay Mitchell
ICGA/ICMB Marketing Director